Allie Gavin
Senior PR Consultant

Six Tips for PR Pitching Success

May 28, 2024

It’s harder to pitch stories successfully now than ever in history. Reporters are overwhelmed, working with limited resources, and under pressure to write stories and share their work on social media. With so much on their plates, many reporters delete or never read PR pitches. 

At the same time, pitching is a foundational part of PR, and plenty of PR pitches lead to successful coverage. While there are many intangibles to successful pitches, certain practices can help your pitch succeed. Here are the six crucial steps for a successful PR pitch.

  1. Ask if It’s News: The most crucial part of a pitch is sharing something newsworthy. Now, everyone in PR has needed to pitch something they knew wasn’t a story because a client was determined to do so. But the best bet for any pitch is to know what you offer is a story. Part of this is looking closely at the targets. Most pitches won’t crack The New York Times but might be perfect for vertical or specific publications. 
  2. Keep It Short: If a reporter decides to open an email (and that’s a big if), the clock is running Reporters are looking for a reason to hit delete or go elsewhere. Respect their time and try to reach your point in 150 words or less. 
  3. Include Essential Resources: If a reporter decides to pursue the story thanks to your newsworthy, short pitch, they will want to learn more. Attach a press release or a fact sheet or include links to resources. Don’t make reporters look for this information. At the same time, avoid overkill. Even if your pitch is newsworthy, short, and well-written, a reporter might move on if they see three to five attachments clogging their inbox and memory. 
  4. Include Current Contacts: Make sure it’s easy to find the best contact information in the pitch. Don’t mistakenly include old contacts or email addresses and phone numbers that don’t work. If reporters don’t reach the right person, they’ll move on. Check the numbers and emails.
  5. Double-Check the Target: PR people often send dozens of email pitches daily. Sending a pitch to the wrong person wastes your time and can make you look sloppy. “Spray and pray” strategies no longer work in 2024.
  6. Relationships Are the Gold Standard: The best PR professionals cultivate relationships with writers over the long haul. They then know what interests writers and the best way to reach them. Work to build those relationships, partially through the good practices outlined above.

Pitching can be very hard and often thankless. But if you approach it from a place of mindfulness and view it as an opportunity to help, it can be rewarding. Keep your pitches short, simple, accurate, and newsworthy; you will find the target.

Interested in working with an all-senior PR team with decades of collective PR pitching experience? Get in touch at hello@wearemgp.com

 

Allie Gavin
Senior PR Consultant

Six Tips for PR Pitching Success

May 28, 2024

It’s harder to pitch stories successfully now than ever in history. Reporters are overwhelmed, working with limited resources, and under pressure to write stories and share their work on social media. With so much on their plates, many reporters delete or never read PR pitches. 

At the same time, pitching is a foundational part of PR, and plenty of PR pitches lead to successful coverage. While there are many intangibles to successful pitches, certain practices can help your pitch succeed. Here are the six crucial steps for a successful PR pitch.

  1. Ask if It’s News: The most crucial part of a pitch is sharing something newsworthy. Now, everyone in PR has needed to pitch something they knew wasn’t a story because a client was determined to do so. But the best bet for any pitch is to know what you offer is a story. Part of this is looking closely at the targets. Most pitches won’t crack The New York Times but might be perfect for vertical or specific publications. 
  2. Keep It Short: If a reporter decides to open an email (and that’s a big if), the clock is running Reporters are looking for a reason to hit delete or go elsewhere. Respect their time and try to reach your point in 150 words or less. 
  3. Include Essential Resources: If a reporter decides to pursue the story thanks to your newsworthy, short pitch, they will want to learn more. Attach a press release or a fact sheet or include links to resources. Don’t make reporters look for this information. At the same time, avoid overkill. Even if your pitch is newsworthy, short, and well-written, a reporter might move on if they see three to five attachments clogging their inbox and memory. 
  4. Include Current Contacts: Make sure it’s easy to find the best contact information in the pitch. Don’t mistakenly include old contacts or email addresses and phone numbers that don’t work. If reporters don’t reach the right person, they’ll move on. Check the numbers and emails.
  5. Double-Check the Target: PR people often send dozens of email pitches daily. Sending a pitch to the wrong person wastes your time and can make you look sloppy. “Spray and pray” strategies no longer work in 2024.
  6. Relationships Are the Gold Standard: The best PR professionals cultivate relationships with writers over the long haul. They then know what interests writers and the best way to reach them. Work to build those relationships, partially through the good practices outlined above.

Pitching can be very hard and often thankless. But if you approach it from a place of mindfulness and view it as an opportunity to help, it can be rewarding. Keep your pitches short, simple, accurate, and newsworthy; you will find the target.

Interested in working with an all-senior PR team with decades of collective PR pitching experience? Get in touch at hello@wearemgp.com