Justin Norton
Senior Content Director

Five Ways To Reduce Endless Revision Cycles

June 04, 2024

Every PR professional has been there: a press release is in its umpteenth iteration, and the list of people invited to edit it has grown exponentially. As a result, the release is a mess. 

The “too many cooks in the kitchen” problem isn’t confined to press releases. It can appear in any client content, like bylines, blogs, pitches, website copy, etc. 

What generally happens is that someone wants to make sure everyone is happy and that they don’t offend someone or shut them out by not letting them take a crack at a piece of work. While this may help office politics, it’s disastrous for clarity and messaging. The whole purpose of writing a press release or piece of content is for it to be read and published, resulting in media coverage. Write to be read, not to make everyone and their dog happy.

Here are a few practices that might save you from “revision Hell” and produce better work.

  1. Decide Who Needs to Review It: At the outset of a client relationship, determine who must see a piece of work. Don’t just include someone because they are part of the team. Leave reviews and approvals to the parties involved (the person named on the press release) and an executive if possible. If you can work directly with a single executive to get their sign off and avoid a piece of work dying by committee on the long slog to approval, even better. 
  2. Establish a Clear Review Cycle: Determine who will review and approve work and stick to that process — before multiple projects are in the pipeline. For example, someone at the agency drafts a work and then has a colleague review it. The work can then be sent to a client for review, ideally by no more than two people, and then returned for final proofing and submission. It’s a simple process – with a dedicated approval chain – that will prevent many headaches.
  3. Push Back Against Bad Writing: Clients often edit or change work simply because they can, not necessarily because it improves the writing or story. A PR agency’s name and a client’s name are on a piece of work. If something looks bad or is poorly written, it’s the PR agency’s job to tell a client. Doing so will help the client get coverage and preserve their reputation with the media.
  4. Watch the Suggestions and Edits: Edits and suggestions should be tracked and accepted so that whoever looks at a document next sees a new, clean version. Piling edits, comments, and highlights on top of each other is a recipe for mistakes.

 Check It: While a good human editor is best, services like Grammarly can spot typos or grammar mistakes before you send a document. Please edit that press release or content before it goes live.

Looking for help with PR strategy, digital PR, or public relations? MGP Public Relations is a top PR firm. Get in touch with us at hello@wearemgp.com

Justin Norton
Senior Content Director

Five Ways To Reduce Endless Revision Cycles

June 04, 2024

Every PR professional has been there: a press release is in its umpteenth iteration, and the list of people invited to edit it has grown exponentially. As a result, the release is a mess. 

The “too many cooks in the kitchen” problem isn’t confined to press releases. It can appear in any client content, like bylines, blogs, pitches, website copy, etc. 

What generally happens is that someone wants to make sure everyone is happy and that they don’t offend someone or shut them out by not letting them take a crack at a piece of work. While this may help office politics, it’s disastrous for clarity and messaging. The whole purpose of writing a press release or piece of content is for it to be read and published, resulting in media coverage. Write to be read, not to make everyone and their dog happy.

Here are a few practices that might save you from “revision Hell” and produce better work.

  1. Decide Who Needs to Review It: At the outset of a client relationship, determine who must see a piece of work. Don’t just include someone because they are part of the team. Leave reviews and approvals to the parties involved (the person named on the press release) and an executive if possible. If you can work directly with a single executive to get their sign off and avoid a piece of work dying by committee on the long slog to approval, even better. 
  2. Establish a Clear Review Cycle: Determine who will review and approve work and stick to that process — before multiple projects are in the pipeline. For example, someone at the agency drafts a work and then has a colleague review it. The work can then be sent to a client for review, ideally by no more than two people, and then returned for final proofing and submission. It’s a simple process – with a dedicated approval chain – that will prevent many headaches.
  3. Push Back Against Bad Writing: Clients often edit or change work simply because they can, not necessarily because it improves the writing or story. A PR agency’s name and a client’s name are on a piece of work. If something looks bad or is poorly written, it’s the PR agency’s job to tell a client. Doing so will help the client get coverage and preserve their reputation with the media.
  4. Watch the Suggestions and Edits: Edits and suggestions should be tracked and accepted so that whoever looks at a document next sees a new, clean version. Piling edits, comments, and highlights on top of each other is a recipe for mistakes.

 Check It: While a good human editor is best, services like Grammarly can spot typos or grammar mistakes before you send a document. Please edit that press release or content before it goes live.

Looking for help with PR strategy, digital PR, or public relations? MGP Public Relations is a top PR firm. Get in touch with us at hello@wearemgp.com